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  1. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself alertec modafinil п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. A funeral of death: laughter in dark moments. How to detect and help a family member with a gambling problem A baobab in the heart, a reflection of The Little Prince 70e4f62
  2. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself what is modafinil п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. Keys to differentiate real hunger from emotional hunger. Forgetting or learning to live with it Harry Sullivan's interpersonal theory 70e4f62
  3. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself buy modafinil 200 mg online п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. Elicitation: how to get them to give us information The neuron: characteristics and function 5 habits that will bring you closer to your dreams 70e4f62
  4. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself modafinil australia buy п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. The psychopathology of consciousness Noam Chomsky: biography of a brilliant mind Why do I feel out of control? 70e4f62
  5. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself modafinil comprar п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. Seamstresses in solidarity: needle warriors making masks When the mind goes faster than life Donald Trump's personality according to psychologists 70e4f62
  6. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself modafinil discount п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. Offshore The importance of being active people Preventing childhood obesity is to ensure the health of our children. 70e4f62
  7. Self-injury: when I hurt and destroy myself online pharmacy modafinil п»їIt is a practice in which the person hurts himself, so that he transforms his emotional pain into a physical pain that is easier to cope with. Self-injury is a way that some people use to make sense of their suffering and to localize this suffering in the physical world. The consequences of self-inflicted harm are not reduced to physical sequelae, there are also emotional consequences, less visible, but usually deeper and more permanent over time. These consequences make the person relapse into self-injurious behaviors, usually starting with superficial cuts or wounds and increasing in intensity, frequency and depth. As its name suggests, self-injury is a behavior that involves causing harm to oneself through different mechanisms. Among the most common self-injuries are cuts, burns, blows, scratches, tearing hair or even consuming drugs or substances harmful to health. Although they can appear at any time of life, they are more likely to occur during adolescence, that stage so strongly linked to emotions and hormonal changes. A self-injury is a symptom of a problem, they are never a disorder in itself. The data are alarming since, for example, they indicate that a good part of the consultations in hospitals are due to self-injury and that those who have practiced it once are more likely to reoffend. Factors that trigger self-injuryBy simply meeting one (or more) of these conditions is not enough to self-injure, however, the following increase the risk of inflicting pain or injury: being a female between 15 and 25 years old, growing up in a family with drug or alcohol addiction problems, being unwantedly pregnant, being sexually or psychologically abused, going through a parental divorce, feeling anxious, lonely or depressed, and having financial problems. In recent times there has been an increase in cases of adolescents who self-harm and post videos on social networks cutting their veins, burning their arms or tearing off their skin. Undoubtedly a dangerous "fashion" that hides a much more serious problem than the behavior itself implies. Psychologists affirm that images or videos of young people self-injuring represent a great danger for those with a "fragile" personality, since they are still a very powerful act of propaganda. Even on the net there are guides available to start self-destructive behaviors, attending the demand of people who feel the temptation to self-injure. To cite a few examples of relatively well-known people who have self-injured, actress Demi Lovato used to hurt her wrists due to emotional disorders; actress Drew Barrymore vented her rage on her arms because she thought they were too fat; singer Courtney Love claimed she cut her skin several times; and the late Princess Lady Di acknowledged acts of self-injury in stages of severe depression. Unlike suicide attempts (which seek to end life and suffering), self-injury causes pain and is a distraction or an "escape route" from problems. In many cases it can also be a punishment for something bad that the person has supposedly done. Among the main motives are: To attract attention: self-injury can be a way to get attention through the damage, in this case it is not the pain that is sought but the fact that the marks are visible to really arouse empathy. Threatening: self-injury can also appear in the form of a threat. The person who self-injures or threatens to do so wants his behavior to serve to bend the will of others, in a form of emotional blackmail really pernicious. Punishing oneself: self-injury is usually present if there is low self-esteem, guilt, feeling responsible for a specific situation, hating or rejecting oneself, etc. Escaping emotional problems: pain becomes a way to divert attention from a much stronger, invasive and persistent internal pain. Physical pain serves to interrupt a cycle of negative thoughts, so that our brain has to focus on the physical damage. Believing that one is in control: many of the injuries we cause ourselves are beyond our control and transfer a great sense of vulnerability. Thus, self-injury can function as a way to control this damage or part of it. Feeling empty: lack of attention from the family, parental abandonment, divorce, disappointment in love or lack of affection in childhood can give rise to a feeling of emptiness that produces the need to feel something definite, even if it is pain. As we have said before, self-injuries are not a mental illness, in any case they are a symptom that there is something going on behind. Thus, if we attack the symptom in isolation we can reinforce its appearance and, even if we manage to make it disappear, the cause that has produced the symptom will always remain latent. In this way, the best thing to do before practicing any intervention is to get the person to go to a specialist who places the self-destructive behavior in its mental context, thus facilitating the intervention and the direct attack on the cause. You might be interested in... Adolescent self-esteem, a challenge for parents Parents cannot forget their great responsibility in the education of adolescents and in building their self-esteem. The Dobby effect, do you feel guilty about everything? Perceiving from the heart: the art that not everyone knows how to enjoy No time 70e4f62
  8. Phytotherapy for anxiety and depression modafinil wiki п»їAnxiety or mood disorders are behind much of the discomfort felt by people in our society. Faced with these problems we have different tools to design and propose an intervention. Thus, in this article we will focus on how phytotherapy can be used for anxiety and depression. Phytotherapy consists of the treatment of diseases through the use of plants or plant products. Currently, there is much scientific evidence of its efficacy, especially in mild and chronic conditions. However, to achieve this efficacy, it must be used properly. Let us see how phytotherapy can help in the treatment of such common disorders as anxiety and depression. AnxietyAnxiety disorders involve episodes of intense worry and fear about everyday situations. There may be panic attacks that are difficult to control. These episodes can be prolonged in time and are not proportional to the real dangers. Conventional treatment of anxietyThe usual treatments for anxiety include drugs and psychotherapy. Regarding psychological therapy, it is usually carried out according to the cognitive-behavioral therapy approach that helps the patient to control situations and symptoms. Regarding pharmacological treatment, there are many anxiolytic drugs specially designed for the treatment of these disorders. Among them are the well-known benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam, bromazepam, lorazepam or diazepam. Antidepressant drugs, low-dose neuroleptic drugs such as risperidone or quetiapine, and even some antiepileptic drugs such as gabapentin are also sometimes used. DepressionDepression is a mood disorder that causes constant feelings of sadness and lack of motivation. It is often accompanied by tiredness, lack of energy, sleep disturbances, feelings of guilt, suicidal thoughts, etc. Conventional treatment of depressionAs in the case of anxiety, psychotherapy and antidepressant drugs are usually used, although there are also other alternative therapies. Within the antidepressants we find different types; among them are: SSRIs or Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine or escitalopram . MAOIs or Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors, such as selegiline. Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, such as duloxetine or venlafaxine. Tricyclic antidepressants, such as imipramine or amitriptyline. Atypical antidepressants, such as mirtazapine, bupropion or trazodone. Phytotherapy for anxiety and depressionThe treatment of these disorders is often complex. Phytotherapy for anxiety and depression has proven to be effective on certain occasions and with certain patients. It is not a matter of eliminating pharmacological treatments but, many times, of complementing them or reducing their doses. The most effective plants in the treatment of anxiety and depression are among others: Valerian. Lime blossom. Hops: it is indicated in the treatment of mild symptoms of mental stress. According to its traditional use, it is effective for anxiety and restlessness. Passionflower. California Poppy: it is indicated as an anxiolytic and sedative. It can be used in states of anxiety, sleep disturbances and nervousness. Melissa: improves mood, has beneficial effects on cognitive behavior, reduces stress and has anxiolytic properties. It is indicated for states of restlessness, tension and irritability. Orange blossom. Hypericum or St. John's wort, for example, is one of the most effective plants against depression. It is accepted by the AEMPS or Spanish Medicines Agency as effective in the symptomatic treatment of states of decay that are accompanied by fatigue, sleep disturbances, discouragement and lack of interest. It is indicated, therefore, in episodes of mild to moderate depression. It should be taken into account that hypericum can interact with other drugs, such as amitriptyline, some benzodiazepines, simvastatin, digoxin, finasteride, some oral contraceptives, etc. Regarding adverse effects, it should be remembered that no treatment is free of them. Even in the case of medicinal plants, the indications of the specialist should always be followed. Do not fail to consult your doctor, especially if you combine different treatments, as they may interfere with each other. Conclusion: phytotherapy for anxiety and depressionThe conventional treatment of anxiety and depression is often limited by the presence of side effects or drug interactions, for example. This is due to the fact that drugs are often abused as the first and only measure for these disorders. For this reason, and taking into account that each person is unique and each case is also unique, it is necessary to look for other alternatives, such as phytotherapy, that can help us. Other examples are psychotherapy, proper nutrition, physical exercise, stress management, use of probiotics, etc. Be sure to consult your doctor to help you find the treatment that best suits you. You may be interested in... Probiotics in the treatment of depression and anxiety Probiotics help in the treatment of depression and anxiety thanks to the gut-brain axis, which connects the nervous system with the microcirculatory system.... Mileva Maric, a marvelous mind in Einstein's shadow The stress of the housewife Exercising helps you to have a more prodigious memory. 1139006
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